Best of the Week in Language Learning

Some weeks deserve a snapshot that lives on forever in the photo album of your life, and for me this week has been one of those. On Monday I was proud to share my audio bonus for "How the Shiny fall" with you lovely blog readers. Did you like it? There was also a good amount of productivity in the work on the new language learning book and some fun online and offline lessons. With all of this, I thought today I would share a slightly different post with you, a look at the Best Of this week.

If you want to see more posts like this, leave a comment and let me know!

Shout out to "Menschen" by Hueber

I use the Menschen books regularly for teaching German at A1-A2 level. Hueber is a publisher that already has a bunch of popular books (Themen and Schritte for example) under their belt, and the Menschen series is designed to be a little fresher and more modern and work for those that aren't intending to immigrate, but still want to develop a solid knowledge of the German language. Their coursebooks come with lots of audio examples (free to download) and the exercises are well structured, varied and build up logically. So far I've used the full A1 and the A2.1 editions and found them both great, so I recommend you get a copy for yourself and your tutor if you are learning German.

NOTE: If you would like to order a Menschen book and find the Amazon listings confusing (lots of editions and levels), please comment or email. I can help you find the right book for your needs. The books themselves are for immersion so do not feature instructions in English.

Language Learning Game: Who am I?

This game is an excellent practice method for practicing introductions and question making, requires no more than 2 players but works with big groups and even on Facebook. It's very much a variation on 20 questions. One player selects any famous person and researches basic info about them, such as age, date of birth, residence, place of birth and job. The other players now ask any question about the mystery person - all is allowed except for the name.

Example, in German/French: Wer ist die Person?/Qui est la personne? - Alter/Âge: 66 (sechsundsechzig/soixante-six) - Beruf/Métier: Politiker - Herkunft/Origine: Graz, Österreich/Autriche - Wohnort/Place de résidence: Kalifornien/la Californie

If you know, post your answer in the comments :)

German Grammar Cheat Sheet

One of my students brought this to a class a few weeks ago - an extremely handy grammar summary featuring conjugation, prepositions and other goodies from It's a ready made reference paper to print out and file at the front of your language learning folder.

grammatik poster

News Article of the week: Are Children really better at foreign language learning?

Experienced writer Anne Merritt sums it all up about "my brain's too old" myths and discouragement in this informative article for the Telegraph. Must read - just don't get too caught up in the comment section!

And that is it for today, I hope you enjoyed this little round-up of links and resources and I look forward to your guesses at my mystery person!