Progress Report after 13 Months of "Slow Welsh Language Study"

Waw, mae'r amser yn rhedeg...time flies (or runs, as my dodgy translation implies).

I have been learning this new language for about 13 months now...so let's have a look what the middle ground looks like!

Before you read the post, download your copy of the free "Teach Yourself Toolkit" in the Fluent Cool Kids Club. It's got links to all the resources I use.

I Spoke Lots of Welsh in Wales!

welsh study update

Back in August, I fulfilled one of this year's language goals and spoke Welsh at the Eisteddfod, the National Festival of Wales. The festival was one week long, with a big site located in Abergavenny, South Wales.

I pitched up my tent for 4 days at one of the official campsites. What a total delight! Immediately, I was hearing people of all ages speak Welsh around me and everyone addressed me in Welsh. In fact, I was surprised, because turns out..

Welsh is real, mae'r Gymraeg yn go iawn!

It's not a postcard language, and it's not even a dying language. Not when you hear and see it all around you, witnessing thousands of people as they celebrate their art, music and identity. Even though I had been learning the language for a year, this was my first experience of feeling how truly alive Welsh is in this world.

In terms of culture and enjoyment, the Welsh festival was amazing. Wales is such a small country that you can make friends with everyone in just a week. From meeting the bands I love (Plu, Candelas) to hanging out with the creators and learners of Say Something in Welsh, every conversation evolved naturally. I often found myself invited to film screenings and discussions (lots of gwin am ddim - free wine!), quickly forgetting I was attending the festival on my own.

Language Immersion is Easy

The Eisteddfod visit showed me that it doesn't take much to create an environment where you learn this new language. Simply go where people speak it. Hearing the language spoken around me was a boost even before I opened my mouth. Yet I also worked on creating speaking opportunities from the start by volunteering as a steward so I was forced to get involved and talk to people from the minute I arrived. It was the perfect Welsh immersion environment.

Impressions from Eisteddfod week

I liked having English as a backup. It was very reassuring to know that I can stop or ask for a word when I need to... I would have never remembered the word for "self-employed" (hynan cyflogedig) if it hadn't been for so many reminders from my conversation partners.

The Fight For Welsh Language Rights

One of the groups I want to highlight is Cymdeithas yr Iaith, an advocacy group for Welsh language rights.

Cymdeithas is an activist group founded in 1962, promoting the right of Welsh citizens to live their lives in two languages. Without them, there would be no bilingual road signs. Old Welsh people may not understand official letters sent in English only. And there would be no education in Welsh. In other words, the language would be dying a lot faster.

Find out more about language rights in our podcast episode with Wikitongues.

If you want to join me at the next Eisteddfod, here's a helpful guide for English speakers.

Speaking and Understanding Welsh After 14 Months

The benefits of visiting Wales and speaking and hearing my target language took hold right away. I was myself having a 15 minute Welsh conversation with an old man in a tiny village, just one week after.

Since returning from Wales, it's been tough to maintain this immersion but I continued to practice. Back in October, I booked a tutoring session with Mererid and my range of conversation was HUGELY improved. It's really great to know that you're impressing your tutor!

I continue to work through the Say Something in Welsh lessons and switched from the old to the new course system back in September. Yes, so I started at the beginning again but that doesn't feel like a setback at all. I loved the opportunity to consolidate my language skills so far. In fact, I got through the first 8 lessons at 1.5 speed, and am now halfway through the course. Say Something in Welsh is intense at times, and it's making me feel like a very confident speaker. I'm also reading a lot of Welsh as I subscribed to the learner magazine Lingo Newydd.

Grammar and Vocab in Welsh

My system is to practice WLCR (Write, Look, Cover, Repeat) using my own notebook. I also maintain a personal Memrise course with the 30% of words that are the hardest to remember. So overall, my vocabulary in Welsh has now grown to about 500-700 solid words - maybe 1000? Who's counting! Studying vocabulary is never going to be a walk in the park when you don't have classes or conversations every day.

--> Learn more about WLCR techniques in my Vocab Cookbook

I'm very happy with my grammar progress, finding that I'm able to say and describe more patterns (he says mae o'n dweud...he said naeth o'n dweud...he was saying oedd o'n dweud ...and so on). Everything still seems to have lots of extra rules and dialects, but I've not had to study many tables at all.

Being an experienced language learner is a big advantage for me here. I find myself seeing patterns and recognising the rules a lot more quickly, and I am confident when I make new sentences out of these structures. I always loved how language can be so playful when you get a pattern.

My Welsh Language Level After 13 Months?

I'm not performing to a set standard, however I've recently downloaded the Mynediad (Beginners) exam guidelines. I'm planning to work through these materials with a tutor. I am pretty much there, meaning I've reached the end of level A1 by studying "little and often" for a little bit more than a year.

Is this impressive? No idea. I don't feel that I would be able to share this on YouTube as a major polyglot win, but at the same time this is something I know I've learnt for life.

The thing about studying for 13 months is this: My time is not wasted just because I've not learnt everything yet. It is time well spent, moving forward, step by step to conversation levels. When you think about how quickly you can learn a language, it's easy to consider any slow periods as "wasted time", but I believe that the long-term commitment is what counts when you want to progress and grow your mind.

What's Next?

In terms of listening, I wish that I had more opportunities to hear real people instead of TV or radio characters. I feel ready to graduate from TV subtitles, but the radio and TV are still too fast for me. What to do?

As a podcast junkie, I would love a slow Welsh news podcast like News in Slow French, or perhaps a learner's story show. I have heard that there's some useful stuff on YouTube, but it's not enough. Give me more Welsh!

My biggest goal is to speak and eavesdrop more. I want to be able to witness conversations in Welsh easily, so that means the following practical goals for December:

  1. Book another tutoring session
  2. Speak Welsh at Polyglot Pub on 6 December
  3. Spend an hour every week listening to the language, ideally spoken by real people around me (failing that, BBC Cymru and S4C will do)

I'm also planning a social media project based on my friend Lindsay's new Social Media Course. More about that in the next blog update!

How Are You Getting On In Your Language?

Are you learning lots, or struggling to find time? Let me know in the comments below!

How to Stay Motivated in Language Learning (Even When You're Not Feeling It)

language motivation

In our latest podcast episode, my co-host Lindsay Dow and I found ourselves discussing one of the big topics in language learning: the ultimate struggles, good moments and bad moments.

These are true for every language learner we've ever spoken to, so if you're suffering from one of these issues, you are most definitely not alone. And since I've recently spent a bit of time hitting the books to learn more about the science of language learning in linguistics and psychology, I've added 4 research-backed motivation tips to help you love language learning again.

The Ultimate Good In Language Learning

1) Understanding Something You Didn't Expect to Understand

No matter if it's a few words of an overheard conversation or the name of a shop, there is magic in that moment when you realize you know this language. When you understand something new, you participate in unlocking the world around yourself - truly a moment worth waiting and working for!

And as Lindsay points out, this is one reward that never goes away after you cash in. Language learning is an eternal project, and that good feeling is going to be yours time and time again as you improve your skills.

In scientific research, the good feelings and sense of joy you gain from using your intelligence and learning something new are called intrinsic motivation. This describes actions you undertake out of interest, curiosity or because you find something personally rewarding (and not because you're getting paid or instructed). Those moments of feeling smarter and experiencing your personal growth are the internal payment you give yourself for all the hard work of language study.

Becoming aware of them and making a note when you do feel awesome is a great way to stay motivated later in the game, so try keeping a learning diary or sharing your achievements with others whenever you understand something new. You can even start today by commenting here on the blog!

2) Showing People That You Can Speak Their Language

I had this moment in an airport café once. My waitress was just dropping off the bill and as I that noticed the little Polish flag on her name tag, I said "oh, you speak Polish!" She stopped for a few minutes and we started chatting about Poland, Germany and languages, with me demonstrating the very few Polish words I know. But as soon as I even said czesz (hello), her eyes lit up. She said she was so excited and pleased that someone was learning her native language, and how rare it was for this to happen in London. I was excited too, so happy that I'd managed to make her morning.

Even when you can only say 5 words in someone's language, your interest and respect for their home can really make their day. Have you ever found yourself in that feeling? For me it's one of the most wonderful things that can happen to a language learner, and it always keeps me going and trying.

The reward of connecting with new people is a motivation for many language learners. Social psychologist Robert Gardner called this the integrative motive, recognising how language learning motivation can be affected by how much you want to talk to people, how much you want to connect and how curious you are about your target language's culture.

Does that sound familiar to you? If you're feeling like you need a boost for studying, try connecting with someone new. It could be a native speaker on italki or a friend at an event - what matters is that you remember how great it is to connect with people who speak your target language.

The Ultimate Struggle in Language Learning

We are all such busy people, and it's hard to put a foreign language up there along with other priorities like family care, paid work, or (for me) editing a podcast. Life's crazy, you guys, and that's why I have put time management at the top of all our language learning struggle charts.

Procrastination is a big issue here too. You sit around and find yourself doing the dishes or pairing your socks before you'll even look at that vocab list again.

How can we beat procrastination? My top tip is to ease off the pressure, make your language learning journey more interesting (yes! more videos - sometimes!) and set yourself smaller, more challenging goals. So forget "getting fluent" for now, and ask yourself how you can get a little bit better this week.

The Ultimate Bad in Language Learning

What could be the worst thing about language learning? There are so many great reasons for learning languages, yet something stands in your way. What is it?

For me, one of the biggest boulders in the way of your fluency dreams is feeling like you are not good enough. Research has actually backed this up, showing that low self-efficacy (that's when you think you won't be able to do it) and low self-worth (that's when you think you are too stupid or forgetful or ) really do knock the motivation out of

What solution could there be? Try embracing the Growth Mindset, in other words find the benefits of being lousy right now. It means that you've got infinite scope for improvement, and there is a lot of evidence to show that nothing in language learning is beyond you right now.

It also helps to stop for a minute and look back on what you've already achieved. Learning a foreign language to "fluency" (whatever that means to you) is a long-term game, a journey in which you are always travelling forward. So give yourself some credit. What can you do now that you couldn't do a year ago?

How to Beat Your Language Learning Demons

Fear of forgetting words, fear of speaking, fear of judgement. Is that you? If you connect to those negative feelings, scroll back up to the good parts of language learning. Sometimes it's worth investing a little time in your own mindset before you go back to the books and apps.

Two things that make the negatives worthwhile and reward you so much:

1. That moment where you understand something and you didn't expect it

2. That other moment where someone's face lights up because you're learning their language

Which good moments can you add? I'd love to hear your stories in the comments below. And of course, stay encouraged and keep going. You can totally do this.

For more information about coaching and access to lots of free toolkits and worksheets, hop onto the Fluent Language Newsletter today - can't wait to say hello to you on there!

Glossika Review: Powerfully Effective Language Training

I've been looking forward to publishing today's review for a few months now - it's a favourite language course among polyglots.

Here's the short version of my verdict: If you've been frustrated because you can't find a way to speak your target language, this is perfect. Buy and use Glossika courses and you will be chatting in no time - the system works when you speak.

Click here to see the full list of Glossika courses

In my review, I was as neutral-bordering-on-skeptical about the Glossika courses as I am about any others. I don't write reviews about things I don't like. It's often the same marketing that we're bombarded with in this space: fluency, science, natural learning, immersion, blablabla.

But here's the thing: Sometimes something just works.

What Are Glossika Courses Like?

This isn't really a language explainer like my own German courses. The method is all GO, sentence-based and very heavy on the audio. You will hear a sentence and be prompted to repeat it - that's the 2 second version of it.

This simple task of repeating input will solve your #1 problem of having nothing to say. TA DAH fluency.

Glossika isn't for the very early language beginner - if you're looking for a starter, try something like Language Hacking books. This is a method I see as perfect for anyone who's sick of language learning theory and wants to start getting as much practice as quickly as possible.

Sound familiar? Yep. That's the biggest problem adult language learners face.

Does it Work?

My own experiences with the method started with a similar system called Say Something in Welsh, which I've been using for about a year. The method of prompting realistic and natural sample sentences with a native speaker is the Glossika principle, and if you're a Welsh learner you have GOT to get yourself a copy of this right now.

I mentioned the system to my long-term student Randy (who you can hear in podcast Episode 6), he decided to give it a try. Randy's situation might be very similar to yours: a busy person fitting in weekly language study and conversation practice around. He tested Glossika 123 German.

Randy says:

"This course is a bargain for the amount of material you receive. In my opinion, it provides more study material for your money than any other course I have tried (and I have tried just about every one available)." "Of all the self-learning courses I have used, this one is the best. It has the widest range of content and gives me the best opportunity to speak German when I am alone."

Speaking when you've got no one to speak to is an ENORMOUS trick in language learning, and Glossika has taken out the awkwardness.

And here's the thing I can see in Randy, my "test subject": The difference is striking! Within a week or two, I noticed a transformation in his confidence level. Randy found himself cutting out hesitation, he was no longer getting stuck in the middle of his sentences because of one or two missing words. He's made a HUGE jump by activating all of that passive knowledge in his mind.

Glossika is Gold for Intermediate Learners

Glossika's website has impressive claims listed, with accounts such as "400% progress". So can you become a fully rounded expert in a language in a short amount of time using this method?

I'd say yes - if you've been putting in the work. Glossika has this way of unlocking the knowledge you hold within yourself, and it will teach you a million new things.

The language learning process is one of learning lots of new links and having to put them together differently. It's a lot of input, but even more creativity. You can quickly use any method based on repeating audio prompts in order to boost and develop your speaking confidence.

So being fluent in another language also means being able to understand patterns and build your own sentences (in academic terms, you have do develop procedural knowledge). The better you are at pattern spotting and working out the rules, the easier it will be to fit that language jigsaw together.

In conclusion, this is one time when the hype could be real. When you hear accounts of learners who made significant leaps with Glossika within days, you can believe them. This is the experience I witnessed in my students and in myself.

But if you were only using Glossika and nothing else, you might find yourself a fluent parrot rather than a flexible conversationalist. My advice would be to pair this method with a conventional course, ensure you read the transcripts and follow up with grammar points that don't make sense.

If Duolingo is a cute owl, Glossika is one that means business!

If Duolingo is a cute owl, Glossika is one that means business!

Why I'm Convinced You Should Try This

Glossika builds your speaking confidence at a rapid pace, gets you used to a native voice, and challenges you throughout. The payoff for language learners who don't have time and access to regular meet-ups is remarkable, as I've seen with Randy and with myself.

I would recommend the Glossika method for all of you who have spent many hours reading, listening, maybe even writing your target language. If you find yourself hesitating in mid-sentence and you want to feel confident and fluent, this is absolutely perfect.

And for me as a tutor, it's been a godsend to recommend to experienced students.

Click here to see the full list of Glossika courses

Polyglots Will LOVE This

The range of languages on offer from Glossika are unrivalled. They don't just offer the classic set of English, French, German, Russian and Chinese. Instead, Glossika is currently available in over 30 languages. The range of languages on offer from Glossika are unrivalled. They don't just offer the classic set of English, French, German, Russian and Chinese. Instead, Glossika is currently available in over 30 languages. Randy, who's tried and bought dozens of materials, also said

This course is a bargain for the amount of material you receive. In my opinion, it provides more study material for your money than any other course I have tried.

Click here to see the full list of Glossika courses

That number up there isn't even complete yet, as Glossika currently has 46 (!) other language courses in development. I am incredibly impressed by this much commitment to languages from all over the globe, and to celebrating the world's diversity. No matter which language and which country you are interested in, the amazing Glossika range will give you a speaking boost from anywhere in the world.

Have You Tried Glossika Before?

I'd love to hear if you're a Glossika user too. Which language are you studying? How did you find it? Tell me over on Twitter or right here in the comments.

PS: There is no Welsh version yet, but Welsh learners who haven't tried Say Something in Welsh should get themselves over there RIGHT NOW. You're missing out, guys.

The Best Language Learning Tools of Autumn/Winter 2016

This episode of the Creative Language Learning Podcast is as fun as ever, covering the ultimate Good, Bad and Struggling and our Top 5 Language Learning Tools of 2016/17.

So The Podcast is Taking a Break..

Yes, the rumours are true. The Creative Language Learning Podcast is taking a break for a while, going on hiatus and there will not be regular episodes after number 52.

BUT!

That does not mean you're going to miss us too much. Lindsay and I have gone through the archives together, selecting our own favourite episodes for you to try - check them out at the end of this article.

And remember to stay subscribed to your podcast feed in iTunes because we will be producing some one-off episodes for you.

Our Favourite Language Learning Tools for Autumn/Winter 2016

Listen to the show to get the detailed recommendations, and here is a quick index.

lyrics fluent

1) Lyricstraining.com

This website is awesome!! It pulls in music videos from YouTube and VEVO, adds the lyrics and converts the whole thing into a game. Teachers might call it a "cloze exercise", I call it "fill in the gap", and anyone would call this one a whole lot of fun.

2) Gus on The Go

A language learning collection created by parents for children. It's fun, it's beautiful, it's available as an app for your smartphone and tablet. In a sea of language learning apps, Gus on the Go stands out for its design and layout. There are apps available in 28 languages. Highly recommended for getting any young person started in a new language!

3) TuneIn Radio

tunein radio.png

A language learner's classic for natural input. This app and website lets you listen to radio stations from all around the world. It's perfect if you're at that stage where you're looking for a way to "level up" in your language. There are also podcasts, or you could search by favourite music style. The diverse voices of radio DJs and exciting foreign language music will give you a great new challenge.

4) Tiny Cards

This is a new app from the team behind Duolingo. It's all about adorable flashcards helping you review and check your knowledge on anything, from language vocab to colour theory. This promises to take the Duolingo design excellence to a new level. Great if you're looking for a new flashcard app.

5) Eggbun

Yes, it's another super cute app! This innovative little app works like a text chat, where you're chatting with your new friend "Eggbun", who is teaching you the Korean alphabet and language. If you're addicted to texting on your phone, here's an AI teacher who will reply anytime.

  • The app is out for Korean (iOS/Android), Japanese (iOS coming soon, but already out on Android), and soon coming out soon in Chinese. Get your preferred version from the lovely Eggbun website.

Honorary Mention

The All 4 App now has a wonderful "Walter Presents" range, bringing in comedies, dramas and crime shows in a really wide range of languages. If you're in the UK, you go and have a look.

Learn more about how to use TV to learn a language in podcast episode 31.

The Best Creative Language Learning Podcast Episodes

Here are our essential Creative Language Learning Podcast episodes you should not miss. It'll be a while before you're bored!

  • Futurelearn - free online courses provided by UK universities and organisations. They offer some language courses, including Dutch, Danish, Spanish, and Catalan Sign Language (!)
  • News in Slow French

Top 5 Fictional Languages (Podcast Episode 51)

Do you speak Sindarin?

top 5 fictional languages

The world of fictional languages is richer than a London billionaire, and we have researched and collected the most awesome fictional languages for you to learn about.

In this episode, you'll hear the new Good, Bad and Struggling followed by the Ultimate Fictional Languages Chart. Here in the shownotes, you'll see our Top 5 and the best of all links available so you can follow along and listen to the show.

Our Top 5 Fictional Languages

  1. Elvish
  2. Nadsat/ Newspeak
  3. Klingon
  4. Minionese
  5. Simlish

And here is a little bit more background information to tell you which languages we discussed in the show, and what they mean to us.

Dothraki, High Valyrian and Game of Thrones

The languages in Game of Thrones were developed by David Peterson via a referral from the Language Creation Society. David says "You have to start with the language and the people..what might their world be like?"

No character is a better representative of their power than Danaerys Targaryen (Mother of Dragons, Khaleesi, Stormborn, and all that). This queen conquers her lover's heart by connecting to him in Dothraki, the language of the horse people who don't have a word for "boat". She also speaks High Valyrian, and gains an advantage in several scenes in which she understands what's said about her by oblivious fools.

Elvish, Quenya and Tolkien

These languages were made famous as part of the Lord of the Rings saga. Author J.R.R. Tolkien spent nearly 60 years working on Elvish languages: Sindarin, Common Eldarin, Quenya and more - there are roots and language families, and he created a whole language family tree and evolutions rather than just one language, and his world-building skills are breathtaking once you start getting into the endless back stories he created for Middle Earth.

While the Elvish languages remained at the center of Tolkien's attention, the narratives of Middle-earth also needed languages of other races, especially of Dwarves and Men, but also the Black Speech. It's a dystopian parody of an international auxiliary language, just like Sauron's rule over the Orcs is a dystopian parody of a totalitarian state.

Other languages by Tolkien include Kkuzdul (Dwarves), about 5 different Mannish languages, and my favourite, Black Speech of Sauron. What a dedicated life's work.

Klingon and Vulcan

Klingon is a famous alien language - could this be the most famous Alien language? - from the Star Trek world. It was developed by linguist Mark Okrand. Klingon is different from Tolkien's languages as Mark only had to write language for the film dialogue at first, but for the next movie this started growing into a full language. Mark himself has published "The Klingon Dictionary".

I love how Klingon mirrors the culture of its speakers, so that "nuqneH", the Klingon greeting, reportedly translates to no more than "whaddaya want?". There's no "hello" in Klingon.

Klingon has an incredible fan base, evidenced by the existence of the Klingon Language Institute, which provides meet-ups, a certification programme, a language corpus and language exams.

Na'vi

In James Cameron's movie Avatar, the alien race Na'vi were given a fully developed language by linguist Paul Frommer. This represented the demonstration of how advanced the race is, and how it contrasts with the soldier who enters their world.

Simlish

Simlish is a language not developed for a movie or a book, but for a video game. What started out as pleasant gibberish in Will Wheaton's first game in 2000 grew to become a beloved part of the game. Apparently, it's a combination of "Latin, Ukrainian, Navajo, and Tagalog."

Minion Language

The Minions in the Minions films are all voiced by co-director Pierre Coffin. His parents are from France and Indonesia and he spent a lot of time working in London. They didn’t invent a full Minion language because they wanted to keep the funny random gibberish element for humour, and as such this language is a lot of fun for everyone, as there’s bound to be something you understand

Newspeak in 1984

Newspeak is thought control, designed to limit freedom of thought by making the language smaller. In the classic book 1984 by George Orwell created this language. He said "the purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of IngSoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible." shudder

So here is a remarkable example of language used for evil, and you can spot Newspeak vocabulary like un, ante, plus and doubleplus, which gets combined with English words.

Nadsat in A Clockwork Orange

This language -- or is it a dialect? -- was created in the original book "A Clockwork Orange" by Anthony Burgess, and later used by Stanley Kubrick in the film version. The name comes from the Russian suffix for "-teen", and it is indeed a teen speak. Burgess actually learnt some Russian and had a real interest in language. He learnt Malay, and taught himself Persian too.

Nadsat features many Russian-sourced words, such as devotchka, govoeeting, malenky and yarbokles.

What do you think?

Do you agree with our Top 5? Ready to chat a little more? Share your own favourite fictional language in the comments - and tell us if we forgot any important ones!

What Cats Can Teach Us About Language Learning

In today's article, I have something a little different for you: cat philosophy! Let me introduce you to Abigail.

She doesn't know a single word in any language, but she's super smart.

Abigail is my cat, and her favourite thing is snoozing at home. Every day, she looks out of the window and sometimes she plays in the back yard too. And today Abigail left the house in an unusual way - through the front door! I was chatting to my friend and barely noticed her sneaking out, until I found her visiting our neighbours.

Abigail's Adventure

Abigail's Adventure

A second after this picture was taken, Abigail got spooked. Like us humans, she is a creature of habit. So she raced towards the front door, only to find I had closed it in the meantime.

And this is where my cat totally blew my mind.

This little animal with her tiny brain had a backup. Within seconds, she ran up the street and around the corner to reach our back door. I had no idea Abigail knew where the back door is, yet the map in her head told her exactly where to go.

This story might sound completely nuts to you - you've come to a language blogger, why on earth is she talking about cats? But in that one moment where Abigail's inner map directed her to safety, I remembered how language learners feel.

Sometimes you get lost. You forget how to ask a question when you're meeting a native speaker or trying to show your friends what you can do. Or you use the wrong word order, even after practicing for hours.

In those moments, it's time to consult a map.

What's Your Language Map?

I believe that a grammar is a solid language map.

Learning grammar doesn't mean that you have to be perfect. It doesn't even mean that you have to know the rules. But when you're looking for answers or instructions, grammar is the map that gives you what you need. Good grammar guides are your companion, helping you understand how to speak.

Next time you're confused about how to say something, try and check a good guide and you will find that there's a back door for you just like there was for Abigail.

My Offer of Guidance

Here at Fluent, I have created easy grammar courses in French and German.

Most people worry that grammar is too complicated. But in these courses, I know that you will finally get it. I have taught each of these languages for many years, so I have created a step-by-step process that can help you understand grammar quickly and easily.

If you would like to try this out for yourself, Abigail and I have got a special offer for you. You can claim 10% discount on any grammar course in October 2016 by using the code ABIGAIL10.

How to Get a Place on the Fluent Grammar Courses

Click here to get 10% off "Finally Get It In FRENCH Grammar"

Click here to get 10% off "Easy GERMAN Grammar for Beginners"

To order these courses, simply sign up, select your payment method and you'll be ready to start learning.

Each course costs less than one semester of evening classes, and it will save you hours of time in the library or book shop. If you're ready to get it in grammar and study with me, then there's no better time than now.

Do Your Pets Help You Learn Languages?

If you have a pet or two, I would love to hear more about how they have helped you learn languages? Leave a comment and tell me more about vocab cats or dictionary dogs. Can't wait to hear from you!

Take Our European Day of Languages Quiz (Podcast Episode 50)

We did it! You guys stuck with us, listened and wrote in to 50 episodes of the show now, and we want to thank you and tell you how much we appreciate you for this. It's awesome to know that there are language geeks all over the world who enjoy our show.

In This Episode You'll Hear

  • Kerstin's story of creating her European Day of Languages video on YouTube with all of the strangers (did you know I knew nothing about Welsh?)
  • LIVE Good, Bad and Struggling with the Chatroom!
  • Of course, our Huge 36 Question European Day of Languages QUIZ
  • A bittersweet announcement about the show's hiatus after episode 52

 

Missed the Quiz?

Don't miss out! If you want to quiz along, listen to the show recording. We saved all the answers until the end of every round so you can guess along with the live audience.

And if you want a PDF of the Questions and Answers, simply hop over here and join the Fluent Language Cool Kids Club.

What is the European Day of Languages?

It is an annual celebration of the huge variety of languages that live in Europe. No matter if you were born in Europe or not, chances are that you’ve studied a European language at some point. On the European Day of Languages you can join thousands of language learners, teachers, translators, linguists and polyglots to celebrate languages.

Links From This Episode

Peace, Words 'n Harmony (Podcast Episode 49)

Hey everyone, welcome to episode 49 of the Creative Language Learning Podcast. This one is perfect for you if you have ever wondered whether language learning is the way to change the world.

Topic: Language Learning Can Bring World Peace

Language is a beautiful caress that can make strangers melt into friends, but la gusgen is also a verbal door that can be closed in the face of outsiders. (Eddie Butler)

We went for deep stuff, and discussed the many ways that language learning can improve the world. From individual peace of mind, via tolerance in your everyday life, to changing the outlook of your country.

We found it felt wrong not to talk about moving abroad. Considering what's happening in Britain this year, the discussion turned to migration. Do people miss out when something foreign is added to the community? Our discussion might surprise you, because as always all isn't quite what it seems. And yes, we did say the B-word: Brexit.

And what about language education in schools? If we believe that language learning creates world peace, should we make everyone learn as many languages as possible?

The Power of Language

Finally, we only need to give you one word that shows something very interesting: migrant. Even when you're not learning a foreign language, the way that people and media around us use language to shape opinions affects everyone's life.

We touch on the idea that language can send signals about all of us, and make or break peace.

In our discussion, Lindsay and I got as close as you can get to saying horrible words. But not all the way there.

We hope you have a listen to find out more, and get in touch to tell us where you stand on language and world peace.

The Good, The Bad and The Struggling

Routines lapsing for the summer, looking forward to September, and permission to half-ass online courses in this week's catch-up with Lindsay and Kerstin.

What's your Good, Bad and Struggling?

We'd love to hear from you guys on this one. If you want to share what's good, bad and difficult in your languages right now, send your feedback to us. We read every one and your language news could make it to a show intro in the future.

Simply do one of the following:

1) go on Skype and leave a voice message for fluentlanguage
2) or email us at podcast@fluentlanguage.co.uk - include a voice memo from your phone if you can, so we can feature your voice on the show